Archive, Business, Entrepreneur, Featured, Lifestyle, Monika Brkic, Opinion

Simon Sinek on Millennials in the Workplace

Check out this clip from Simon Sinek on “Millennials in the Workplace”. Simon touches on the struggles millennials face due to their upbringing and the battle of dealing with workplace stresses. He focuses on how technology, social media addiction, and growing up with participation awards have affected an entire generation of the working population. Highly recommend taking the time to listen!

 

 

What are your thoughts on what Simon Sinek presented? Do you agree or disagree with the arguments he brought forward?

Business, Entrepreneur, Featured, Monika Brkic, Opinion

Realistic 2018 New Years Resolutions for Young Professionals

New year, new me? Have you broken your new year resolutions yet? How many times have you promised yourself you would change in the new year but have broken your resolutions by February? We are all guilty breaking some resolutions but here are three that we are taking in 2018.

 

Speak Up More in Meetings

As young professionals we sometimes feel overshadowed by the wisdom and knowledge of more senior professionals. This year I am trying to force myself to say my opinion, stop fearing the idea of looking “stupid”, and make sure my voice is heard. People will forget the mistakes you made but they wont forget the great ideas you continually bring forward. 

 

Spend More Time Reviewing Mistakes

It is easy to want to quickly correct and try to distance yourself from mistakes made at work but this year I want to work on learning more from them. Start asking myself what were the actions that lead me there, how can I correct them in the future, and what step can I put in place to keep them from happening again.

 

Start Celebrating Achievements

We are all our harshest critics and especially at work we can become overly critical about our performance. Take the time out of the day to celebrate the great work you were able to accomplish. Don’t be afraid to humble brag about that new awesome project or the presentation you just nailed. This year be proud of yourself and celebrate the work you do!

Archive, Arts & Sciences, Featured, Opinion

Understanding Why I love Film — Millennial Muse

All article credits go to the Millennial Muse. Check out the original article at Understanding Why I love Film.

Ever since I was a kid, sitting in my bunk bed surrounded by all my teddies and toys, I have loved sitting there in the dark and watching the same VHS tapes on my little TV. I have loved being whisked away for an hour and a half to another world, a world that I could join and be a part of. I often placed myself in these cinematic worlds. As an aspiring actor from the age of 6, I found these worlds intoxicating. I could be whoever I wanted: a hard boiled detective, an underdog changing their fate, even the leading lady who gets her happily ever after (before I became a proud female warrior and learnt that being the love interest was way less fun then being the hero). I never gave much thought as to why I loved film so much, I just knew I did.
Then, recently when watching a particular scene in 2016’s ‘Their Finest’ I found myself becoming suddenly emotional. And this was not due to the tragically ill-fated romance of Catrin and Tom, or the depiction of war time London (although incredibly resonant) but because of a scene that managed to reveal to me why it is exactly that I love film. In one line of dialogue I had an answer that I had never really considered before; when discussing their profession, Sam Clafin’s character explains his own philosophy on why we need films, stating that ‘People like films because stories are a structure, and when things turn bad it’s still part of a plan. There’s a point to it.’ That train of thought hit me like a ton of bricks, as I started to realize the truth behind the statement.
As someone who doesn’t handle uncontrollable variables in life well, I began to find an incredible amount of joy within this discovery. No matter how unexpected and often cruel life can be, for a few hours we can all escape to a fictional world that functions in a way we can predict, in a way that we can root for, in a way that I, as a filmmaker, can write and decide myself. I’ve always wanted to tell stories that mean something to those that watch them, to portray the struggles and complications of being alive on this planet and a part of human society, but in a way that allows for a happy resolution, something not everybody is lucky enough to get in the real world. That no matter how hard and difficult things may seem, the protagonist will learn and grow and most importantly; end up where they belong.
There are many things in my own personal story that have seemed pointless or have had me screaming into my pillow ‘WHY ME!? WHY UNIVERSE WHY?’ (In a typical teenager melodramatic tone) Events that for the life of me I couldn’t understand why they had to happen at all- but this scene, this line of dialogue, this revelation made me realize that Film has enabled me to find ways to deal with this issue. To look at mistakes made or times that I regret as something more than an embarrassing or upsetting situation, but part of a plan. The part of my own movie where I learn a bit more about myself and get back up before going to conquer the world.

The Millennial Muse is a London Based Millennial Writer, Recent Film, Theatre and Television Graduate from the University of Reading. Lover of Books, Films and TV. Follow the Millennial Muse by clicking here.

Archive, Featured, Opinion

What to do when you have no Idea what you want to do — Musing of an Unamused

Not all experiences moving into adulthood and the working world are the same. Musing of an Unamused leads us through their perspective of What to do when you have no idea what you want to do. All article credits go to the blog Musing of an Unamused. The original post can be found here: What to do when you have no idea what you want to do.

Article:

I have toyed with the idea of being an RCMP officer, a nomad, a teacher, an engineer, an actress, a massage therapist, and a psychologist. It seems like with every new profession I research there is another person saying. “Becca, just find something you like and stick with it”.

You think a 25 year old who spent 60 grand to go to university would have a set plan in place for their life. Nope, I watch those around me grow up, buy houses, have children, get married, and get full time jobs… and then there is me. After graduating I had waitressed, managed retail, bartended, and had jobs in sales. None of which I have been able to stick with for more than a year at a time. These were all temporary positions just killing time and making money to travel while I decided what I wanted to do.

I think the reason I have had such a difficult time deciding on a profession is that I can’t fully commit myself to anything I don’t love. I don’t like putting all my eggs in one basket because that means sacrificing all of the half filled baskets that contain cluttered hopes and dreams. Therein lies the bane of my contentment with employment. I am bound by my desire to do so many different things that it squelches any chance I have at succeeding in one field.

I was ranting to my friend Beth about this job situation the other day and she brought up an incredible point. She asked, “what makes you thrive, what makes you feel like you are making a difference?” For some people that is organizing, for others its assisting, leading, or service. This made me sit and re-prioritize because for me, work has always been about making money so I can enjoy my time outside of the office/restaurant.

The one consistent in all of my previous jobs was that I would walk into work and instantly think “I can’t wait to quit” or “can someone just pay me to exist?”.  By idolizing positions with a lot of cash flow I completely crushed any hope I had of being in a workplace that I enjoyed, leaving me bitter and negative. So, when I moved out west, I switched my focus and started looking at jobs that I could grow both personally and professionally in. I started applying to jobs I believed I was under qualified for and I started getting interviews at place where, when I walked in the door, I wasn’t just thinking about how many months it would be before I could leave and travel.

“Be who you were created to be and you will set the world on fire” – St Catherine

I love that quote, but I have to remember that the creation of who I am, as a functioning member of society, is going to take time and experiences. Its okay to experiment with different job positions. I strongly adhere to the philosophy that human beings cannot happily do a job where:

a) we are overqualified;

b) we aren’t affecting change or growth in some way;

c) there isn’t variety.

Finding your passion usually doesn’t just come in an epiphany moment. It is sacrifice, and hard work, and sifting through jobs that are completely wrong for you for a little while.

These last few years have been as incredible and life altering as they have been messy. I do not regret any time I have spent in transition. I am happy I took the time at this point in my life to figure out what I really have passion for rather than be 40 years down the road stuck in a profession that makes me miserable.

Follow Musing of an Unamused.

If you like this post, read more like it on the Briefcase. For something similar read our article on 10 Tips for Surviving a Quarter-life Crisis.

Have a comment? Leave it below!

Archive, Business, Entrepreneur, Featured, Opinion

The Power of Entrepreneurial Thinking — Rachel Kellogg

All article credits go to Rachel Kellogg click here to read the original post: The Power of Entrepreneurial Thinking — cats coffee cardigans.

Few endeavours inspire me more than entrepreneurship. The idea of jumping off the safe road to start something meaningful, useful, and real just sounds so cool. As we move through the 21st century, entrepreneurship is gradually becoming the new normal. With the emergence of technology and social media, creative thinkers have more room than ever to look for gaps to fill with their innovative ideas. Even if you don’t want to start your own business, I think it’s a good idea to pretend that you do. This will help you unlock your creativity and figure out what it is that you can offer the world. Here are three ways to think like an entrepreneur.

1. Let go of the fear

The first step to thinking like an entrepreneur is to let go of the fear of self-employment in order to unlock your imagination. If you had all of the money in the world, if you didn’t have to work, what would you do? What would you start? What would you want to do for your ‘day job’? Would it be a hobby of yours like making clothes or painting? Would you dream of being a writer? Would you want to invest in a start-up? Write down what it is you deeply, truly, want and narrow it down to your top one or two ideas.

2. Find your niche

Now that you’ve brainstormed to see what it is you truly want to do, start reading about that industry. Chances are, the reading will interest you anyway because it is likely something that you are passionate about. Once you’ve done a bit of research, start looking for gaps. What is it that you are missing when you read about the industry? How can you offer something to fill that gap? Trust me you will find something.

3. Start something… no matter what

After isolating your passions and ideas and thinking about where your skills can fill gaps in the world… just start. It’s worth spending a bit of money on art supplies, a domain name, a new musical instrument, or design software to start doing what you love. It will be a fun hobby for you and will allow you to explore your passions. Remember, this is what entrepreneurs are already doing. And they’re making money off of it. You don’t ever have to launch your passion as a serious business, you can just do it as something to do. However, don’t rule out the possibility of eventually being able to be your own boss. The world is changing quickly, so it will work to your advantage to see where your unique skills will fit in.

“The world is missing something that you have to offer. What is it?”

Follow Rachel’s blog here: https://catscoffeecardigans.com/

Rachel Kellogg: I am a bilingual (French and English) PR professional in Toronto, I have a passion for creative branding, communications and marketing. I have successfully landed on-message media coverage in top-tier outlets throughout Canada and managed end-to-end digital campaigns.

Currently, I am a Bilingual Communications Specialist at Interac Association and Acxsys Corporation handling digital communications and all French-language communications.

I hold an Ontario College Graduate Certificate in Corporate Communications and Public Relations from Centennial College (2015) and an Honours Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Toronto – Victoria College (2012)

I invite you to explore highlights of my work in media relationsinfluencer marketing/blogger relations and web/social media content creation.

Archive, Featured, Lifestyle, Monika Brkic, Opinion

Office Gift Giving Guide

Holiday season can always be a little tricky, especially in the office. Trying to figure out how who you should buy for, how much you should spend, or what to get can be difficult to navigate. Each office is different but here is good starting point for any young professional. Remember to take everything within the context of your own office and don’t be afraid to ask a coworker what they are getting.

What to Buy for Everyone

Holiday Cards. Write everyone on your team a holiday card. It can be as generic as “Wishing you and your family a joyous time this holiday season. Thanks for all the support this year and looking forward to kicking off 2018!” or something more personal. Try to buy a pack of cards that is “generic holiday” in order to keep everyone included. 

What to Buy your Manager

Gift something with meaning or keep it simple. Try and think of something with meaning or something unique to your relationship. Do you always talk about a favorite sport team, TV show or activity? Focus the gift around those items. Another good gift with meaning for manager with children is buying a gift for them instead. Rather than getting them a “#1 Boss” mug, get their 3 year old a Paw Patrol/Frozen/Cars themed activity book. If you can’t think of anything personal there are always simple options such as a bottle of wine or nice chocolates.

What to Buy the CEO

Nothing. Unless you are directly reporting to or working with the CEO on a special project I would advise against it. Feel free to write them a card or wish them a happy new year passing in the halls but don’t feel like you should buy them something.

Have any good gift ideas? Let us know what you are getting your colleagues in the comments below.

Archive, Business, Entrepreneur, Featured, Opinion

Never Too Much, Always Enough

Inspiration

Thank you to Hannah Wiser for letting us re-share her story. Follow Hannah as she over comes obstacles and finds confidence in the corporate world. Read the full version by clicking here!

One of the hardest parts about being a young professional in the world of 8-5 corporate life is finding your own identity, and even further, being comfortable in that identity. I spent 6 long years in undergrad..(yes, you read that correctly…) mostly because I had no idea what in the world I wanted to do […]

via Never Too Much, Always Enough —

Archive, Business, Featured, Keelin Elwood, Opinion

Stop Sorting: Why Email Folders Have Got to Go!

I am always slightly envious when I see a near-empty desktop with folders left-justified and aligned. Or when I catch, out of the corner of my eye, an outlook with an empty inbox (does this even happen?). I personally have tried to organize my desktop and inbox on several occasions, but the habit never stuck.

For reference, my desktop:

Image of all the folders on Keelin's messy desktop.

It’s not that I couldn’t do it, it’s just that I found it relatively pointless. Now to each their own, but I feel strongly that, for me, sorting emails and files just isn’t on my priority list.

So why don’t I sort my emails, or my desktop, you may ask? Here were my top three reasons for ditching the folders.

  1. I am a little bit of a perfectionist. My folders all needed the perfect titles, and the content of my emails needed to fit perfectly within those buckets. If they didn’t I ended up going down a folder-creating rabbit-hole to ensure the perfect structure for my outlook.
  2. It was wasting my time. Some people have come up with brilliant folder systems that really work for them and save them time. Some people… not me. It was not working for me and I had other things I wanted to do with my time, none of which included sorting my inbox.
  3. I always had to search for the files anyways. Even after all of the different folder set ups I tried, I was still primarily using the search bar to find what I was looking for. And if I was already just searching for what I needed, what was the point of wasting time on folders?

In the end ditching the little folder icons was worth it for me; it saved me time and headache. So if this resonates with you, give it a try. Let the chaos ensue. If it doesn’t and you are a veteran folder-guru, please share your wisdom and techniques in the comments below!

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Archive, Featured, Opinion

Opinion: Networking

Oftentimes as young professionals we connect with more experienced folks in our industry hoping to leverage their skills and expertise. We want a mentor. We want their insights on the work we are doing. Or we just want to further connect within our industry’s network. Now all of those things great, and will help you develop in your career, but as young professionals we constantly forget that relationships are a two way street.

Now, some people are abundantly generous and will give their time and insights without asking for anything in return. But we, as young professionals, do have something to offer as well. We need to remember that we can also bring something to the table. In most instances, to truly build effective, long-lasting relationships both parties have to put in work. Giving back is the glue that holds relationships together. And as professionals in our 20s and 30s we have so much to give. Whether it be new perspectives and ideas, some tips on social media, or just lending an ear, we have plenty to offer. 

Bring value to the table, contribute, collaborate, and engage in all of your relationships and they will be all the better for it in the long run.